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Fresh Food

Are We Finally Waking Up to Climate Change?

It's time for everyone, including the food and farming sectors, to act

The Lempert Report

The record-breaking temperatures, violent weather, crop failures and massive waves of forced migration seem to have woken up the skeptics of climate change. 

Global scientists have dropped their customary caution. They now warn us that we have to drastically reduce global emissions by at least 45% over the next decade. Otherwise, we’ll pass the point of no return—defined as reaching 450 parts per million or more of CO2 in the atmosphere sometime between 2030 and 2050—when our climate crisis will morph into a climate catastrophe, writes Resilience.

Alongside the massive political and economic campaign to move to 100% (or nearly 100%) renewable energy as soon as possible, we must put an end to the massive emissions of our corporate-dominated food and farming system and start drawing down and sequestering in our soils and forests billions of tons of “legacy” CO2 from the atmosphere, utilizing the enhanced photosynthesis of regenerative farming, reforestation and land restoration.

“Regenerative Agriculture” refers to farming and grazing practices that, among other benefits, reverse climate change by rebuilding soil organic matter and restoring degraded soil biodiversity. This results in both carbon drawdown and improved water infiltration and storage in soils. 

Regenerative food, farming and land use—which is essentially moving to the next stage of organic farming, free-range livestock grazing and eco-system restoration—are just as essential to our survival as moving beyond fossil fuels.

It is unlikely we are going to reach net zero emissions in the U.S. by 2030 as the Green New Deal calls for, but it’s a terrific objective and one that we will all depend on to continue to live life as we know it.

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